Last edited by Dojas
Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

4 edition of Historical and legal materials relative to the Tlingit and Haida Claims Act of 1935 found in the catalog.

Historical and legal materials relative to the Tlingit and Haida Claims Act of 1935

Historical and legal materials relative to the Tlingit and Haida Claims Act of 1935

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  • 28 Currently reading

Published in [Seattle] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Indians of North America -- Alaska -- Claims,
  • Tlingit Indians -- Claims,
  • Haida Indians -- Claims,
  • Fishery law and legislation -- Alaska,
  • Fishing -- Alaska

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby William L. Paul.
    SeriesNative American legal materials collection -- title 2924.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Paginationv, 77 l.
    Number of Pages77
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16341978M
    OCLC/WorldCa30419568

    An act known as the Tlingit and Haida Jurisdictional Act, of J , gave these Indians the right to bring suit for claims against the United States in the United States Court of Claims. This piece of legislation had been introduced by Delegate Dimond, and was one of a series of such bills which Delegates from Alaska had brought before. Get this from a library! Alaskan historical documents since [Ronald Lautaret] -- Contains source documents of Alaskan history illustrating economic development, movement toward self government and the treatment of Alaskan natives, from the transfer of the territory from Russia in.

    U.S. GOVERNMENT - Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of Introduction: The Alaska Land Question. When Alaska became part of the United States in , there was no provision in the law for private ownership in the new territory, except for the private individual property holders who had obtained written title to the land under the Russians.   The Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, the building of the trans-Alaska pipeline, decentralization of the state school system, and the establishment of a network of small village high schools may not be as familiar as the geographical features of the state to non-Alaskans, but the impact of these events upon the everyday life of Alaskans is.

    The Tlingit and Haida, as well as other Northwest Coast peoples, used animal emblems as crests (totems) to identify the different social divisions among their society. Crests were also employed to affirm a group’s territorial claims. One’s moiety, clan, and house (lineage) each owned a crest or several crests. Book Description: Sharing Our Knowledgebrings together Native elders, tradition bearers, educators, cultural activists, anthropologists, linguists, historians, and museum professionals to explore the culture, history, and language of the Tlingit people of southeast Alaska and their coastal interdisciplinary, collaborative essays present Tlingit culture, as well as the culture.


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Historical and legal materials relative to the Tlingit and Haida Claims Act of 1935 Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Historical and legal materials relative to the Tlingit and Haida Claims Act of [William L Paul].

Section 8 of the Act of J (49 Stat. ), as amended by the Act of Aug (79 Stat. ); and. All other living persons of Tlingit or Haida blood: 1) Who were legal residents of the Territory of Alaska on Jor prior thereto, or who are descendants of such persons, and.

Fishery law and legislation -- Alaska. Historical and legal materials relative to the Tlingit and Haida Claims Act of (Title ) Fishing -- Alaska.

Historical and legal materials relative to the Tlingit and Haida Claims Act of (Title ) Five Civilized Tribes. The Five Civilized Tribes of.

Historical and legal materials relative to the Tlingit and Haida Claims Act of (Title ) Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of (Public Law ) (Title ) Alaska native land claims (Title ) Alaska native land claims (Title ) D-2 lands set aside under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of (Title ).

The U.S. Court of Claims awarded the Tlingit and Haida people $ million for lands withdrawn to create the Tongass National Forest and Glacier Bay National Monument. It was not until that Congress passed Public Lawgiving the Central Council access to.

In —the same year that Alaska was admitted as a state—the Court of Claims decided in favor of the Tlingit and Haida for payment of land that was taken from them.

The Tlingit-Haida land claims involved 16 million acres without a defined monetary value; an actual settlement took years to conclude. The Central Council Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska stood in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux.

This was a fight for all native tribes but the Tlingit tribe was there to support it. It was their legal effort to protect their people and as they are water people it. #IndigenousYouTube #NativeYouTube #haidanation SOURCES Central Council Tlingit and Haida: AK history Course. David Morgan: David Morgan, a school teacher form Hoonah, was the first president of the Central Council.

Morgan served as president from when it was organized until During the period of his leadership the organization concentrated primarily on trying to raise money to press the land claims suit. Andrew Percy Hope: These materials are comprised of records documenting the work of lawyers James E. Curry and I.

Weissbrodt from the s to the s while their legal firms were employed by the Tlingit and Haida Indians to fight for fishing rights and regulations, timber development, and.

The Haida are an indigenous people of the west coast of North America. The Haida Nation claimed territories comprise an archipelago called the Queen Charlotte Islands or Haida Gwaii as the Haida refer to the islands - and parts of southeast Alaska.

The Haida are commonly referred to in Canada as being a First Nations "band" or a "tribe" in the parlance of the United States. InCongress authorized the Tlingit and Haida Indians to file a lawsuit in the Court of Claims to obtain compensation for the extin- guishment of their aboriginal title to lands.

Paul, William L. - "Historical and Legal Materials Relative to the Tlingit and Haida Claims Act of " May Subseries 3: Alaska Purchase, boundary disputes, and statehood reference material. Historical and Legal Materials Relative to The Tlingit and Haida Claims Act of undated: 5/ "Historical Aspects of Tlingit Clans in Angoon, Alaska" Scope and Content: Reprinted from American Anthropologist, vol number 3.

And sometimes they are meant to garner political support for a law by giving it a catchy name (as with the 'USA Patriot Act' or the 'Take Pride in America Act') or by invoking public outrage or sympathy (as with any number of laws named for victims of crimes).

History books, newspapers, and other sources use the popular name to refer to these laws. Proud Raven, Panting Wolf is notable for foregrounding Tlingit and Haida perspectives about the parks and the totem poles within them.

Seeking to understand how Native communities understood the totem park project and its legacy, Moore interviewed Claude Míijuu Morrison (Haida), the last living elder to have worked on the parks in the s; his descendants; and the descendants of other carvers.

This webpage is operated by the Sealaska Heritage Institute’s (SHI) Archivist and Collection Manager and seeks to open a scholarly dialogue on Southeast Alaska Native history and heritage. Located in Juneau, Alaska, SHI seeks to collect and preserve materials that document the history, culture, heritage, and language of the Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian people and to make these materials.

The Eyak, Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian share a common and similar Northwest Coast Culture with important differences in language and clan system.

Anthropologists use the term Northwest Coast Culture to define the Eyak, Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian cultures, as well as that of other peoples indigenous to the Pacific coast, extending as far as northern [ ].

[4] Section 2 of the special jurisdictional act authorizes the bringing of suit by the Tlingit and Haida Indians of Alaska on all "claims of whatever nature, legal or equitable, which the said Tlingit and Haida Indians of Alaska may have, or claim to have, against the United States, for lands or other tribal or community property rights, taken.

The Tongass National Forest (/ ˈ t ɒ ŋ ɡ ə s /) in Southeast Alaska is the largest national forest in the United States at million acres (68, km 2).Most of its area is part of the temperate rain forest WWF ecoregion, itself part of the larger Pacific temperate rain forest WWF ecoregion, and is remote enough to be home to many species of endangered and rare flora and fauna.

Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska (Tlingit & Haida) is a tribal government representing o Tlingit and Haida Indians worldwide.

We are a sovereign entity and have a government to government relationship with the United States.Inthe Alaska Native Brotherhood voted to pursue tribal land claims against the federal government, and in the ANB achieved an initial success when Congress passed a jurisdictional act authorizing the "Tlingit and Haida Tribes" to bring suit against the United States in the U.S.

Court of Claims. As this legal case slowly took.The lawsuit accuses Neiman Marcus of violating the Indian Arts and Crafts Act (IACA), a federal law enacted in to ensure that products marketed and sold as “Indian” are actually made by Native Americans or Alaska Natives.

The complaint stems from the company’s use of the term “Ravenstail.”.